Riverside University Health System of Moreno Valley, California Contracts with JSA Health Telepsychiatry

The Riverside University Medical Center Emergency Department (ED) provides emergency medical care in Moreno Valley, California. The hospital receives approximately 85,000 patient visits a year. RUHS Medical Center serves as the first responder in the case of natural disaster for Riverside County. As a designated Level II Trauma Center for adult and pediatric care, the Medical Center treats nearly half of all trauma patients in the County. The medical facility is equipped with a helipad and an on‐site decontamination unit, enhancing the hospital’s capacity to handle any type of health care crisis.
RUHS Medical Center evaluates 4011.6 patients on emergency detention from correctional facilities for behavioral health emergencies.  Such patients will be seen in one of three private rooms in the Emergency Department along with a member of Law Enforcement from the sending institution. Importantly, JSA will be providing juvenile detentions as well due to JSA’s capacity for doing child and adolescent emergency telepsychiatry evaluations.
JSA is pleased that RUHS has determined that we can provide the high quality emergency telepsychiatry evaluations the facility is looking for. JSA continues its mission to serve emergency departments, mental health patients, and their significant others … to treat in the least restrictive manner possible … honoring a person’s psychological, social and cultural needs during a psychiatric crisis.

 

Hospital

 

From the RUHS Website:

Why RUHS
​​​Riverside University Health System (RUHS) includes the 439-bed Medical Center in Moreno Valley, 10 Federally Qualified Health Centers and several primary and specialty clinics throughout Riverside County, and the departments of Behavioral and Public Health. RUHS has been the foundation of health care, community wellness and medical education in Riverside County for more than 100 years and employs about 6,000 team members.

We are committed to delivering exceptional care through an integrated network of skilled and compassionate health care professionals who inspire hope, healing and wellness. RUHS is a teaching organization where generations of doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and public, behavioral and allied health professionals have been trained. We provide sensitive and culturally appropriate support for families and individuals facing behavioral health challenges and substance abuse issues, as well as trusted programs aimed at improving the lives and advancing the health of our communities. At Riverside University Health System, our legacy of excellence is just the beginning of healthy future. ​

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JSA Health Telepsychiatry is a behavioral health telemedicine practice that provides 24/7 access to high quality telepsychiatry care for a wide variety of settings including emergency departments, community health clinics, educational institutions, correctional facilities and a wide variety of distant locations including cruise ships throughout the world’s oceans. We use high-definition HIPAA compliant telemedicine technologies to connect patients and healthcare organizations to experienced mental health professionals. For more information please call 1-888-792-7122 or email at info@jsahealthmd.com.

The Houston Methodist Hospital System Chooses JSA Health Telepsychiatry To Provide Emergency Telepsychiatry Evaluations

 

 

JSA Health Telepsychiatry is pleased to announce that we have been chosen to provide emergency telepsychiatry evaluations for the Houston Methodist Hospital System. We are proud and a bit humbled by Methodist Hospital’s choice. For the fifth year in a row, U.S. News & World Report named Houston Methodist Hospital the No. 1 hospital in Texas and No. 1 in the Houston area.

The system encompasses 8 hospitals in and around Houston:

Houston Methodist Hospital

Houston Methodist San Jacinto Hospital

Houston Methodist St. John Hospital

Houston Methodist West Hospital

Houston Methodist Sugar Land Hospital

Houston Methodist The Woodlands Hospital

Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital

Houston Methodist St. Catherine Hospital

JSA’s team of emergency telepsychiatrists will be providing round the clock, on-demand evaluations to Methodist emergency departments, medical/surgical floors, and intensive care units. The Methodist Houston – JSA relationship marks an expansion of JSA’s pre-existing telepsychiatry service for Houston Methodist’s Behavioral Health Unit. JSA is committed to quality biopsychosocial evaluations to both hasten a patient’s medical and mental recovery from illness, and provide Houston Methodist physicians with rapid and comprehensive behavioral health assessment to help with risk management.

 

More information about Houston Methodist from the Houston Methodist Website:

 

OUR REPUTATION FOR OUTSTANDING CARE, TREATMENTS AND RESEARCH ATTRACTS PATIENTS FROM TEXAS, THE NATION AND THE WORLD

Groundbreaking research performed at Houston Methodist has added years to the life of Matt Futer, who, in December 2006, received a death sentence. Doctors at another hospital diagnosed him with glioblastoma, the most aggressive and deadly form of brain cancer.

An ambulance immediately took Futer to Houston Methodist’s Kenneth R. Peak Brain and Pituitary Tumor Treatment Center. He participated in a clinical trial, during which specialists used a unique gene therapy designed to strictly attack tumor cells.

Now, an eight-year glioblastoma survivor, Futer has lived significantly longer than most patients, many of whom die within three years after diagnosis. Before receiving treatment at Houston Methodist, Futer also faced a grim prognosis, three months to live.

“I feel like I was given the chance to help others,” he said. “In May of ‘07, I was in England doing sheep dog trials with a friend of ours, which, by all means, shouldn’t have happened. 
And here I am … years later, a miracle.”  — Matt Futer

LEADING MEDICINE

Houston Methodist’s teams of surgeons, physicians, researchers and other experts collaborate to solve medicine’s biggest challenges and turn discoveries into new therapies and treatments. Our drive for innovation is rooted in the legacy created by world-renowned cardiac surgeon Dr. Michael E. DeBakey. He performed the first coronary artery bypass surgery in Texas, and pioneered surgical advances, which have become universal practices.

These days, Houston Methodist not only is well established as a leader in heart and vascular treatments, research and education based on DeBakey’s achievements and reputation, but also is known for spearheading breakthroughs in organ transplantation, orthopedics, cancer treatment and neurology and neuroscience.

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JSA Health Telepsychiatry is a behavioral health telemedicine practice that provides 24/7 access to high quality telepsychiatry care for a wide variety of settings including emergency departments, community health clinics, educational institutions, correctional facilities and a wide variety of distant locations including cruise ships throughout the world’s oceans. We use high-definition HIPAA compliant telemedicine technologies to connect patients and healthcare organizations to experienced mental health professionals. For more information please call 1-888-792-7122 or email at info@jsahealthmd.com.

Mitchell County Hospital is JSA’s Newest Program With Our Rural Texas Hospitals Project

JSA Health Telepsychiatry is proud to have been selected to provide statewide telepsychiatry to up to 149 rural hospitals throughout the state as part of a wide ranging project through the Network Access Improvement Program (NAIP) in Texas.

This work continues with the addition of Mitchell County Hospital Health Systems or Colorado City, Texas. JSA telepsychiatrists will be providing psychiatric consultation to the Mitchell County Hospital Emergency Department and Medical/Surgical ICUs.

 

From the Mitchell County Health Systems website:

 

In 1913, “The Phoenix Sanitarium” was established and labeled after its founder Dr. N. J. Phoenix, as the first hospital of Colorado City, Mitchell County Texas. The word “hospital” was not used during this era as the word “sanitarium” was commonly utilized.

In 1920, Dr. C. L. Root purchased a residence located south of the Colorado River on top of a small hill and converted it into the Colorado Sanitarium (pictured above). Seven years later, he constructed a hospital building that consisted of nine patient rooms located on Chestnut Street and called it the C. L. Root Hospital (pictured below). At that time the cost to stay in the hospital was $5.00 a day and the Root Memorial Hospital expanded into 12 beds, an operating room, a delivery room and a small detached building which housed the nursing staff. The kitchen was located in the nursing quarters. Food trays were delivered across the ambulance drive way in freezing cold temperatures as well as when the hot sand blew relentlessly. There was no air conditioning during the warmer times of the year, but patients had electric fans in their rooms. Patients were also given hot rubber draw sheets to keep warm during the winter time.

In 1939, all of the employees at the hospital were Registered Nurses with the exception of the cook. The nurses were paid $60 per month and were given their room and board. They worked 12 hour shifts and had one day off per month. The administrator served as the bookkeeper, lab and x-ray technician, anesthetist, nurse supervisor, plumber, electrician and yard man. The nurses did the rest of the work, including janitor work. Nothing was disposable. Dressings were made from bolts of gauze fabric. The needles, syringes and rubber tubing had to be cleaned, sterilized and recycled.

A new ambulance driveway was constructed in 1958. The nurse’s housing was changed to a dietary department and a doctor’s lounge. A connecting corridor was constructed between the two original buildings. In 1963, a vacant lot adjacent to the hospital led to the creation of a 50 bed nursing home known as the Root Valley Fair Lodge. That same year another addition was completed for the lab and x-ray departments.

The inception of Medicare in 1966 created a financial hardship for the hospital leaving the future uncertain. Both city and county representatives sought a solution with the hospital administration to keep delivering patient care. In 1967, Mitchell County citizens voted for the conception of the Mitchell County Hospital District, a governmental entity, to gain tax support. In 1974 the Hospital District began participating with the city and county to provide ambulance services for the community. Unfortunately, both city and county officials did not want to partially fund the Emergency Medical Service any longer; therefore the hospital district took over sole responsibility.

The 70+ year-old hospital (pictured above) desperately needed to be replaced. This necessity led to the construction of a brand new facility in 2004; which is currently located near Interstate 20. Family Medical Associates, our community rural health clinic, moved to the site when it was established and remains the clinics home. The Heart of West Texas Home Health Agency, which had been owned and operated by the hospital district, was sold to a private company in 2008.

Today, Mitchell County Hospital District (MCHD) is a 25 bed critical access hospital which retains a Level IV Trauma Designation. The district also owns and operates MCEMS (Mitchell County Emergency Medical Service), which supports 24 hour seven day a week service for our county. Mitchell County EMS has two full-time crews (one first-out crew, one back-up crew for transfers).

MCEMS averages 80 runs a month, and makes 25 transfers a month. We employ 8 full-time and 7 part-time employees, including 12 paramedics and 3 EMT’s. Our EMS responds to 911 calls within Mitchell County. These calls result from motor vehicle accidents on Interstate 20, which transects Mitchell County from east to west and from State Highway 208, which runs north and south in the county. MCEMS also responds to calls from two nursing homes, a dialysis center, and two Texas Department of Criminal Justice Units, the Wallace and Ware Medical Units. Many calls come from residents in their homes who have medical emergencies and need to come to the hospital emergency room. We participate in mutual aid with other EMS facilities in the surrounding counties of Scurry, Nolan, Fisher, Coke, Sterling and Howard Counties. This occurs when we or other EMS units need additional help on calls due to multiple injuries which occur in trauma situations. MCEMS is located at 1602 Chestnut Street.

Family Medical Associates (FMA) is our rural health clinic that is owned by MCHD. Currently FMA has grown to acquire 3 physicians, 1 general surgeon, and 1 Nurse Practitioner. FMA also house’s our Specialty Clinic that is attentive to your medical needs and offers options to help you make informed decisions on important health matters by bringing in doctors from a variety of medical backgrounds. Presently there are specialists in Urology, Gynecological, General Surgery, Cardiology, Nephrology, Podiatry, Neurology, Oncology, and Ophthalmology. MCHD also owns Valley Fair Lodge (VFL). This is a nursing home that provides care to 44 residents. The daily operations of VFL are overseen by WCG Resource Management, a company which contracts with the hospital district to provide this service. Valley Fair Lodge is located at 1541 Chestnut Street.

 

JSA is looking forward to this project to further help persons with behavioral health disorders in Texas. Our thanks to Mitchell County Hospital for the opportunity.

 

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JSA Health Telepsychiatry is a behavioral health telemedicine practice that provides 24/7 access to high quality telepsychiatry care for a wide variety of settings including emergency departments, community health clinics, educational institutions, correctional facilities and a wide variety of distant locations including cruise ships throughout the world’s oceans. We use high-definition HIPAA compliant telemedicine technologies to connect patients and healthcare organizations to experienced mental health professionals. For more information please call 1-888-792-7122 or email at info@jsahealthmd.com.

Texas Juvenile Justice Department Southeast Region Chooses JSA Health Telepsychiatry as Provider for All Sixteen Regional Entities

 

JSA Health Telepsychiatry is proud to have been chosen by the Southeast Region Texas Juvenile Justice Department to provide exclusive telepsychiatry services to 16 counties in the region. This is an exciting and innovative program … part of the TJJD commitment to ensure that the most severe of juvenile justice dispositions are limited to youth with the highest risk of recidivism … including those with behavioral health disorders. With the addition of telepsychiatry, diversion can now be pursued with regards to detention facilities and inpatient psychiatric treatment by providing community based telepsychiatry interventions with JSA telepsychiatrists.

 

Montgomery and Brazos Counties are not participating in this project at this time.

The Southeast Texas Region is made up of 24 jurisdictions covering 29 counties. There are two large counties (Harris, and Fort Bend), eleven medium counties (Montgomery, Brazoria, Galveston, Jefferson, Brazos, Angelina, Orange, Liberty, Polk, San Jacinto, and Trinity) and sixteen small counties (Jasper, Newton, Sabine, San Augustine, Hardin, Waller, Chambers, Wharton, Walker, Matagorda, Austin, Grimes, Houston, Tyler, Leon, and Madison). The total juvenile population of the region is 878,165 or 27.6 percent of the State of Texas juvenile population.

The region hosts five secure post-adjudication correctional facilities: • Brazoria County Residential Treatment Facility (males/females); • Fort Bend County Juvenile Leadership Academy – Secure (males); • Galveston County Post-Adjudication Center (males/female); • Burnett Bayland Rehabilitation Center – Harris County (males); • Leadership Academy (males/females); and • Harris County Youth Village (males/females).In fiscal year 2015, the Southeast Texas Region placed 4,238 youth in post-adjudication correctional facilities and non-secure placement programs.

 

From the TJJD website regarding Diversion:

 

TARGET POPULATION FOR DIVERSION The goal of regionalization is to reduce the number of TJJD commitments and, at the same time, ensure that the most severe juvenile justice dispositions are limited to youth with the highest risk of recidivism. From a research-informed perspective, the appropriate target population for TJJD commitments is youth with high risk of recidivism for which less restrictive alternatives have been utilized prior to TJJD commitment. Consequently, an important focus of regionalization is to divert youth with a risk of recidivism assessed as low and medium from TJJD commitment.

 

The Risk-Needs-Responsivity principle guided discussions and analyses of the target population for regionalization. An initial analysis of the risk levels of youth receiving an indeterminate commitment in fiscal year 2014 showed that 28 percent (n=203) had a risk level of “medium” on the community risk assessment tools and another 7 percent (n=49) had a “low” risk of recidivism. A similar pattern of committing low or medium risk level youth was evident in the fiscal year to date 2015 data.

Additional analyses of youth committed to TJJD made it clear that medium and low risk youth for which less restrictive options had not been used, but with high levels of service needs, should be the initial target population for regionalization. For example, of youth committed to TJJD in fiscal year 2014, 30 percent had not been receiving a residential placement option prior to TJJD commitment. Also, more than 30 percent of youth committed to TJJD had less than two prior adjudications. These proportions were similar for large, medium, and small counties and across regions.

At the same time, the low and medium risk youth showed a high need for specialized treatment and other services. Of 385 youth committed in fiscal year 2014 and scoring low or medium on the TJJD risk assessment, 98 percent had at least one specialized treatment need and 70 percent had two or more specialized treatment needs. Specifically, close to half of the youth had a high need for alcohol or other drug treatment, and 50 percent had a need for some level of mental health treatment. Almost two thirds had a high or moderate need for capital, serious, violent offending treatment and about 16 percent needed some level of sexual behavior treatment.

Furthermore, the 385 youths scoring low or medium on risk to recidivate had need for trauma-informed care and extensive educational services. Close to 40 percent of the youth were indicated as victims of abuse or neglect, 28 percent were special education eligible, and on average, they were five grade levels behind in math and close to four grade levels behind in reading. Overall, the data analyses and input from probation leaders pointed to service gaps and lack of resources locally as important contributing factors to commitments of youth with low or moderate risk for recidivism.

The regionalization task force therefore decided that improving services and directing diversion efforts to youth with low and moderate risk levels had to be the priority during the initial implementation of regionalization. The unique characteristics of youth were also considered. Certain youth may best be served outside a restrictive correctional setting. Young children have developmental needs that differ from older adolescents and respond best to curriculum designed with these needs in mind, delivered by staff that have specialized training, along with same-aged peers.

Similarly, youth with complex mental health needs and developmental or intellectual disabilities may benefit most from treatment in a setting that can best accommodate their unique needs. Non-violent youth who do not pose a threat to their homes and communities should be prioritized for remaining in their homes when suitable treatment is available.

And finally, research supports the notion that low to moderate risk youth are best served at lower levels of the juvenile justice continuum. After careful consideration of the above mentioned variables, the Task Force defined the initial target population of youth appropriate for regionalization diversion as all youth who are eligible, and under consideration, for commitment to TJJD. In order to qualify, the juvenile probation department must demonstrate a prior effort to provide appropriate intervention with priority given to the treatment needs of the youth. Interventions should be commensurate with county resources.

Youth who may be especially appropriate for diversion include: • younger offenders (those between the ages of 10-12); • youth with a serious mental illness; • youth with a developmental or intellectual disability; • youth with non-violent offenses; and • youth with low to moderate risk levels for re-offense. As the requirements for commitment to TJJD are changed, risk and needs assessments improve placement, and programming decisions for youth and local programming and services are developed and improved, TJJD expects to see a change in the youth counties are committing to state facilities and those they are seeking to divert through regionalization diversion.

As these changes occur, TJJD will reevaluate the target population and application parameters for regionalization diversion to include more high and moderate high risk youth. All departments in Texas were asked to complete a Juvenile Probation Department Resource Inventory (Appendix F). Using the department inventories, the presidents of each region then developed a Regional Resource Inventory and Plan (Appendix G). One key component of the plan was for the region to establish: • which youth within the target population may be best served given the current availability of resources; and • which additional portion of youth within the target population the region could serve next if provided additional resources within this biennium and future biennia.

The task force acknowledged the variability of resources and treatment options available to each of the 166 departments across the state and agreed that every department must demonstrate efforts to rehabilitate youth consistent with their current practices and aligned with available resources. The target population was designed in an effort to accommodate all departments, allowing for the consideration of the unique needs of each youth rather than be driven by region or department size.

 

 

JSA is looking forward to this project to further help persons with behavioral health disorders in Texas. Our thanks to Palo Pinto General Hospital for the opportunity.

 

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JSA Health Telepsychiatry is a behavioral health telemedicine practice that provides 24/7 access to high quality telepsychiatry care for a wide variety of settings including emergency departments, community health clinics, educational institutions, correctional facilities and a wide variety of distant locations including cruise ships throughout the world’s oceans. We use high-definition HIPAA compliant telemedicine technologies to connect patients and healthcare organizations to experienced mental health professionals. For more information please call 1-888-792-7122 or email at info@jsahealthmd.com.

Palo Pinto General Hospital Has Chosen JSA Health Telepsychiatry for Hospital Wide Emergency Telepsychiatry Consultations

 

JSA Health Telepsychiatry is pleased to announce the start of new hospital wide telepsychiatry consult service for Palo Pinto General Hospital of Mineral Wells, Texas. The project is part of the Texas statewide access project to up to 149 rural hospitals needing multi-specialty telemedicine care. Palo Pinto General Hospital is a general medical and surgical hospital in Mineral Wells, TX, with 42 beds. Survey data for the latest year available shows that 21,249 patients visited the hospital’s emergency room. The hospital had a total of 1,846 admissions. Its physicians performed 766 inpatient and 1,130 outpatient surgeries. Palo Pinto General Hospital is an award winning hospital including the Woman’s Choice Award for America’s Best Hospital for Emergency Care:

 

History from the hospital website:

 

The Palo Pinto General Hospital District came into being April 20, 1965. This was the culmination of many months of work following a request by the Sisters who operated the Nazareth Hospital in Mineral Wells. The Order felt they could no longer maintain the Nazareth Hospital due to decreased personnel and the need for modernization.

The Palo Pinto General Hospital Auxiliary was formed by a group who had been Auxilians at the Nazareth Hospital. By-Laws were adopted and signed by ten Charter Members on February 8, 1968. These members were – Msds. William O’Quin, O.B. Lance, J.F. Bailey, A.W. Dennis, Byron Greene, B.L. Miller, T.L. Sullens, Wayne Schwalm, John Westbury, and Sam Hawes.

The new hospital was completed and a day for public viewing was held July 26, 1970. The Auxilians acted as hosts. Over 7,000 area residents attended the open house. Moving day for equipment and patients was August 1, 1970.

Since the early beginnings of the Auxiliary with ten members, it now has approximately 65 active Auxilians and serves PPGH in many different areas both inside and outside of the hospital. While the hospital was being built … the first two floors of the nearby Crazy Water Hotel was used as a hospital.

 

JSA is looking forward to this project to further help persons with behavioral health disorders in Texas. Our thanks to Palo Pinto General Hospital for the opportunity.

 

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JSA Health Telepsychiatry is a behavioral health telemedicine practice that provides 24/7 access to high quality telepsychiatry care for a wide variety of settings including emergency departments, community health clinics, educational institutions, correctional facilities and a wide variety of distant locations including cruise ships throughout the world’s oceans. We use high-definition HIPAA compliant telemedicine technologies to connect patients and healthcare organizations to experienced mental health professionals. For more information please call 1-888-792-7122 or email at info@jsahealthmd.com.

JSA Health Telepsychiatry Is Now Providing Telepsychiatry Consults to Eastland Memorial Hospital

 

JSA Health Telepsychiatry is pleased to announce the start of new hospital wide telepsychiatry consult service for Eastland Memorial Hospital of Eastland, Texas. The project is part of the Texas statewide access project to up to 149 rural hospitals needing multi-specialty telemedicine care. Eastland Hospital has been part of the local community since 1952. Eastland serves as the county seat for Eastland County. The hospital serves a population of over 18,000 people and is located 60 miles east of Abilene … and 100 miles west of the Dallas-Ft. Worth area.
Located at 304 South Daugherty Street, the hospital and surrounding physician clinics offer convenient primary care for patients of all ages. Eastland is governed by an elected board of directors, licensed by the Texas Department of State Health Services (TDSHS) and Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), a member of the Texas Hospital Association(THA) and Texas Organization of Rural and Community Hospitals(TORCH) and a number of Eastland’s staff are members of their respective professional organizations.
JSA is looking forward to this project to further help persons with behavioral health disorders in Texas.
The history of the hospital is quite extraordinary … here excerpted from the hospital website:

 

Three blasts of the fire whistle. That was the signal. 10:15 a.m. Who was the first patient at the spanking new hospital? Phone calls flooded the central office, asking for the person. It was an 8 1/2-pound Texan, who brought his mother along and made the front page of the Telegram that night in 1952.

Just about every man and woman in Eastland had an investment in the hospital. It was built without a cent of government aid, built after hours – from 6:30 p.m. till midnight – with coffee and doughnuts for pay.

Every week night, as quick as they could finish supper, men went up to Hospital Hill (dedicated years before). Anywhere from 30 to 50 would show up to dig the foundation ditch and basement. Lawyers, ministers, merchants, and a young doctor, too, dug night after night.

Women were there, too, with coffee and doughnuts. Coffee by the pailful and dishpans of doughnuts, along with a few words of praise that somehow made every night a celebration.

One of the women was a timekeeper, keeping strict account of every hour until the work was over around 11 p.m. or midnight. Next day the newspaper carried names of the men and women who’d served the night before. Twice a week, Mrs. Sam Butler did a radio broadcast from Hospital Hill.

So it went on, long after the novelty wore off.

Contributions came in many forms. A Dallas industrialist, when asked for a special price on concrete blocks, told his manager: “Give those folks all the blocks they need and send one of our engineers to help lay them.”

 

Short 12,000 feet of steel, it seemed once that work would have to stop. Next morning, trucks were unloading it on the hill!

Plumbers, electricians worked exhausting hours at night, with coffee and companionship to keep them awake. Women planned color schemes, draperies, pictures, linens, beds – thousands of hours of planning and working. And so the job somehow got done, after nine solid months of work. Months of laughter, fun horseplay and stories already grown to legends.

In seven hours, 100 cubic yards of concrete were poured. And except for the man at the mixer, not a skilled workmen among them. One night, just above freezing, 35 men put on 4,000 square feet of roof decking in a 20-mile an hour wind. You can’t pay men for that. Except with coffee and doughnuts.

Eastland’s hospital cost a total of $36,112 to build. That’s $4.51 a square foot – about a third the usual cost at that time.

Eastland’s hospital was approved by the American Medical Association and by state and national hospital associations. Young doctors came to look over the town. Two decided to settle.

And then, on June 8, 1953, came the grand opening, attended by 2,000 people. Every ethnic origin and every economic status in Eastland was represented that day. The building now stands as a monument to a community which laid aside social, racial and religious differences, banded together to erect a structure exemplifying the American spirit of community living.

 

Hospital services include:

Acute Care Unit

Cardiac & Pulmonary Rehabilitation

Case Management/Discharge Planning

Emergency Department

Emergency Medical Services

Infection Control/Employee Health

Laboratory

Medical Imaging/Radiology

Nutrition Services

Outpatient Services

Pharmacy

Physical & Speech Therapy

Respiratory Therapy

Skilled Nursing

Sleep Studies

Specialty Clinics

Surgical Services

Wellness Center

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JSA Health Telepsychiatry is a behavioral health telemedicine practice that provides 24/7 access to high quality telepsychiatry care for a wide variety of settings including emergency departments, community health clinics, educational institutions, correctional facilities and a wide variety of distant locations including cruise ships throughout the world’s oceans. We use high-definition HIPAA compliant telemedicine technologies to connect patients and healthcare organizations to experienced mental health professionals. For more information please call 1-888-792-7122 or email at info@jsahealthmd.com.